We did it!

After years of dramatic funding cuts, 2018 was the year that we spoke up as a city to fight for Auckland Art Gallery's future. After months of showing Auckland Council just how loved the Gallery is by locals and visitors – change is happening.

The much-needed support for the cultural heart of our city was heard loud and clear – and on 28 June 2018, a funding increase of $2m a year for the next 10 years was confirmed for Auckland Art Gallery. 

Thank you to the thousands of Aucklanders and out-of-town lovers of the city who got behind the cause in big and small ways – from sharing their 'pART of me' selfies and signing our supporter scroll to attending our pARTies and reaching out to local councillors to rally their support.

And there's still more good change to come – scroll down to see what we're working on in the next while to ensure the arts and culture in Auckland thrives for years to come. 

     

    There's still plenty of great work to be done.

     

    Gallery Governance Board.

    With the Cultural Sector Review currently looking at the governance model for Auckland's cultural institutions, we're making the most of this opportunity. We have sent in a submission, calling for the re-instatement of a dedicated Governance Board for Auckland Art Gallery – we'll keep you updated with any progress!

     

    Local Body Elections.

    Here's something to think about – the next Local Body elections for Auckland Council are in 2019. Start talking to your local candidates now about the importance of the visual arts (and Auckland Art Gallery) to our city. Vote for the Councillors listing art and culture amongst their campaign interests – with the right city leaders, we can ensure our city's future is truly creative.

     

    And in other good news...

     

    The Local Government Amendment Bill is currently in Select Committee hearings, with one of its main objectives being to restore the purpose of local government to "promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural wellbeing of communities". This is amazing news for public art galleries around New Zealand.

    "...When we think about the role and function council plays in our everyday lives, it's far much more than roads, rates and rubbish... The four aspects of wellbeing – social, economic, environmental, and culutral – will be embedded into the fabric of local government regulatory framework." – Nanaia Mahuta
    “As I've said before — and it's one of the reasons I wanted to keep the Arts, Culture and Heritage portfolio — I believe arts and creativity are integral and inseparable parts of what it is to be human. My goal, and my government's goal, is to help that flourish.” – Jacinda Ardern
     
     

     

    What happens when the core cultural backbone of Auckland, loses its place
    in the city?

     

    People disappear.

    More than 500 000 people love and visit our Gallery every year. Imagine a Gallery that is no longer free for all of us, and isn’t open every day. It’s a no brainer – numbers will seriously dwindle.

    You lose reputation.

    Fewer international shows, inability to support New Zealand artists, lack of capacity to care for collections – like the much loved Lindauer and Goldie collections – loss of confidence by private donors to pARTner with the Gallery… What is now an internationally renowned gallery could become a ho-hum regional facility with little ambition.

    Young minds suffer.

    The Gallery’s education programme currently serves over 40,000 young people – and for many students, this is their only access to art in their lives. What will happen to the creative potential of our future generation if the Gallery can no longer afford to support these young people and their schools?

     

    Imagination is drained.

    Without adequate funding for an ambitious exhibition programme, the opportunity for the community to play, be creative and imagine is drained. Participation in the arts leads to greater wellbeing for individuals and communities